SIHH 2015 Roundup: Panerai – Everything You Need To Know, With Original Photos And Pricing Replica Watches Free Shipping


Apart from the motion, the situation silhouette, and that sandwich dial, another signature element of this Luminor household of watches is the fact that lever-operated security system for dogging the crown down. This system is simple, robust, and smart. The curved shoulder lever includes a small roller on the end of it that, if you lock it down, then presses on the wafer-shaped crown against a gasket from the crown tube, sealing the watch. It’s more elaborate than a screw-down crown, but it offers a very positive method for ensuring water remains out of the situation and it’s an excellent alternative to the slightly neater feeling of a screwed-down crown (and there’s no risk of cross-threading either, as occasionally occurs with watches whose crowns are screwed into place). Another big advantage of this locking lever is that it is just plain fun to play, and although to do so too much is kind of against the spirit of this watch (the whole point of an eight day movement was supposed to decrease to a minimum the amount of time the crown is in an unlocked position) in the exact same time you will likely find the urge to play it irresistible.Despite the dimensions, this is only one of those easiest-to-wear watches I’ve ever had on. As a result of the thick but still pliable strap, which tapers in thickness in the lugs to the tip, it seems really secure and it’s a joy to get on. The very best thing about it, aside from the opportunity to play with the locking lever, is the dial; this item glows like a harvest moon.This is a little personal note; my very first memory of a watch was my Dad’s Benrus, shining like mad in 1968, therefore any watch that lighting up the night the way PAM 560 does is okay by me. The movement is a far better piece of work than that I gave it credit for initially. It is fair, it appears bulletproof and it has plenty of really nice chronometric features hard to find at this cost, and if you would like something with the total amount of design the PAM 560 has this also includes a free sprung balance and 8 days of gas in the tank it has a very small list. I am a late convert to the Panerai faithful and I’m not saying that there are not other watches out there with this price point that do not offer you a wonderful value too — but then again they are not Panerais.

Panerai’s SIHH 2015 line-up was compact, comprising five key models, but it did bring some novelty to the table, including the Carbotech Submersible and the elaborately engraved Radiomir Firenze.

A cult brand that has reached maturity, Panerai kept its focus this year, offering just five new models (though one is not a typical Panerai). Interestingly they were all clustered in the mid-five figure price range, with no entry-level models introduced at SIHH 2015. [All prices are in Singapore dollars (S$) and include 7% tax. US$1 = S$1.35] Of the five new models, two were Submersible models, Panerai’s name for its dive watches with rotating bezels. The one that got the most attention was the Luminor Submersible 1950 Carbotech (PAM616), featuring a carbon fibre composite case rated to 300 m.

Carbon composite materials are not new in watch cases, in fact they are somewhat passé, but this is the first time Panerai is using this material. The striped pattern on the case comes from the method used to produce the material, which calls for layering multiple sheets carbon fibre with a polymer to bind them together, before being baked in an autoclave to harden it.

The markings on the dial have bezel have a tan, faux-antique look, as well as bright blue accents, something Panerai favours this year.

Thought a lightweight material, the Carbotech Submersible is quite weighty, likely due to the size of the case as well as the metal inner case to which the case back is screwed. The case is 47 mm in diameter, with the automatic P.9000 movement inside. The Carbotech is no a limited edition, 500 pieces will be made annually, with a retail price of S$24,800. The blue accents are also found on the new Luminor Submersible 1950 3 Days Chrono Flyback Automatic Titanio, offered in two guises, both flyback chronographs. The simpler of the two is the PAM614, equipped with a 30-minute chronograph. 

This has a 47 mm titanium case, and the P.9100 movement inside. Thanks to the co-axial placement of the elapsed seconds and minute hands on the central axis, the dial is clean, save for the constant seconds at nine and a date at three. 500 pieces will be made each year, priced at S$22,400.

Using the same movement but with the addition of a 12-hour counter is the PAM615. Beside the chronograph, this is also distinguished by the black ceramic insert on the bezel, a feature also found on the Luminor Submersible Amagnetic. Also an annual edition of 500 pieces, this will cost S$24,800.

The other new chronograph launched is an entirely different beast. 52 mm in diameter, the Mare Nostrum Titanio is a remake of a prototype deck chronograph for the Italian navy dating from the 1940s. 

Limited to just 300 pieces, this is equipped with a beautifully finished Minerva movement, explaining the S$58,200 price tag. You’ll find more about this in the story published last month. Also a limited edition is the Radiomir Firenze PAM604. Limited to 99 pieces and available only at the Florene boutique, the Radiomir Firenze has a 47 mm steel case decorated with gun engraving. 

Engraved by an Italian craftsman, decorating the watch case takes a week. The engraved motif is taken from Florentine history, and includes the Florentine lily, the symbol of the Italian city.  

The dial is black, but unlike most other Panerai dials it has a sunray brushed finish. Inside is the hand-wound P.3000 movement. The Radiomir Firenze costs S$29,800. The last new timepiece is something that strays far away from Panerai’s core competencies: an equation of time with eight-day power reserve. This is not Panerai’s first watch with that complication, the honour goes to the L’Astronomo, which had both a tourbillon and equation of time.  Though based on the same basic movement, the new equation of time wristwatch lacks a tourbillon, making it significantly more affordable. Offered in a 48 mm Radiomir 1940 case (PAM516) or 47 mm Luminor 1950 case (PAM601), the equation of time is powered by the P.2002/E calibre.

A scale on the dial graduated from -15 to +15 indicates the equation of time, that is the difference between the standard 24-hour day and solar time. Because the Earth orbits around the Sun in an ellipse rather than a circle, the actual length of a day is not exactly 24 hours. But due to the graduations of the scale, the equation of time displayed is only an approximation.  

The sub-dial at nine is the seconds, while the one across is for the month – “D” indicates December, “M” is for March and so on. Over on the back an indicator for the eight-day power reserve is integrated onto the bridge for the gear train.

The Radiomir 1940 Equation of Time 8 Days is priced at S$29,100, while the Luminor 1950 Equation of Time 8 Days is $29,800.

The rest of our SIHH roundups are right here:

A. Lange & Söhne

Cartier

Greubel Forsey

IWC

Jaeger-LeCoultre

Panerai

Parmigiani

Piaget

Ralph Lauren

Roger Dubuis 

Vacheron Constantin